Bath's Annual Fringe Visual Arts Festival
FAB is Bath's only visual arts festival, we actively promote and celebrate contemporary art in the Bath area and beyond, showcasing early career artists and curators, and those who find it difficult to break into (or prefer to operate outside of) the gallery based art scene.
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Traditionally, a paintingʼs edge was defined by a frame, dictating the beginning and end of the work. Artworks are no longer so self contained; canvases are hung unframed. Sound and light are accepted mediums and are necessarily edgeless. Work can be purely conceptual with no solid form. Sculpture is not limited to a free standing structure but can incorporate the very fabric of a building, blurring the boundaries between art, space and audience.

It is this ‘grey area’ we are interested in. Far removed from a framed painting hung on a gallery wall,‘uncontained’ artworks can be unfixed and undefined physically, spatially and perhaps conceptually.


Grey Area brings together a handful of artists from across the UK. Installation, sound, light, film and performance combine to create a collection of lively and evolving spaces.

Curated by Jenny Cooper and Megan Hoyle

Artists include: Megan Hoyle, Vicki Ley, Claire Prosser, Trevor H Smith, Rebecca Helen Page, Will Kendrick, Chris Witherall, Ashanti Harris and Emily Ilett

OPENING NIGHT: 25th May 6-9pm

PARTY IN THE CITY: 1st June (evening performances)

 

ASHANTI HARRIS AND EMILY ILETT
emilyilett@hotmail.co.uk
emilyilett.co.uk
ashanti.harris@live.com 

Ashanti Harris & Emily Ilett began collaborating during their studies at The Glasgow School of Art.  Working with sculptural video installations and performance they explore myth, ritual, the elements, sense and movement. Their work often begins with the documentation of a task, process or performance which they develop into video installations with strong hypnotic qualities. Harris and Ilett are both founding members of The Pipe Factory, Glasgow and co curators of the performance event OK-YUH-PAHY as part of the Glasgow International Festival of Visual Art 2012. They have exhibited collaboratively at A Cinematic Space, New Territories, The Arches, Glasgow 2011; EX, Blip Blip Blip Gallery, Leeds 2011;Resonance FM Stand, Frieze Art Fair, London 2010.

 Bow, 2011. Video Still

 

TREVOR H SMITH
trevorhsmith.co.uk
thtsmith@gmail.com 

Trevor H Smith uses his practice, which includes both written and visual work, as a means to explore his interest in a range of cultural phenomena, particularly those that revolve around language, and the gaps in meaning that occur between presentation and interpretation.  He is interested in the narrative potential of such phenomena, and the possibility that an idea or thought may be expressed through them.

Cards (exquisite tenderness) 2012

 

MEGAN HOYLE
meganhoyle.co.uk
megan@meganhoyle.co.uk 

Hoyle’s work is formed through a desire to investigate the materials of painting. Repetitive, durational performances unravel canvas before the unpicked threads are redeployed.  Almost always the threads are soaked, coated, dripped or poured with oil medium. This retains the viscous, sticky nature of painting whilst allowing Hoyle to investigate the drying behaviour of the medium. The works shown for Grey Area seek to provoke a sense of curiosity and discovery.  They will conceal themselves from the viewer, whilst asking those who notice them to question their formation.

Megan Hoyle is an artist living and working in Bristol, UK. Recent exhibitions include OK-YUH-PAHY, as part of Glasgow International Festival, Glasgow, April 2012; EX, Blip Blip Blip Gallery, Leeds, September 2011 and Seventy Feet, Truman Brewery, London, July 2011. She is co-curator of Grey Area.

 
Medium Behaviour, 2011

 

VICKI LEY
victorialey.wordpress.com

Words:

impossible exchange/ menu/ epoch/ repent/ apparent retrograde motion/ pause/ etc

 

I make work bordering upon system, chaos, logic and dysfunction. Working with familiar non-precious materials; paper, thread, sugar, staples etc, allows for a relationship synonymous with mark and an exploration in the metaphorical. The work aims to create a contemplative space for the viewer. In an obsessive interaction with the controlled variable: White.

My practice is influenced by a fascination with theories of understanding our Universe and existence. This harks back to a naïve interest in all things unknown. This space between knowledge, of things intangible and incomprehensible is the exact area in which my practice sits.

Apparent retrograde motion, digital fragments of past action, 2011

 

 

CLAIRE PROSSER
mindbodyspace.tumblr.com (under construction)

Myself-Other-Object-Space-Place| An Ongoing Experiment

 I see my art as an ongoing project. I see it as an attempt to reach a heightened sense of awareness physically and spiritually not just with myself and my own body, but to establish a relationship within a space/place.

 My main focus is the simplicity of everyday life and how aspects are often looked over. The 'stuff' that makes us alive and human is ignored. Through endurance performances and tasks I try bring these often unseen scenarios to the forefront. I enjoy seeing what mark we can potentially make in our world. I see myself and my environment as two different materials of which I am testing their properties, their thresholds, their abilities and inabilities alike. I am testing the differences and similarities between you and I, him and her, man and nature. My art aims to convey how something seemingly insignificant can impact our surroundings and make us more appreciative of our bodies, ourselves and our environment.

 Through art I aim to investigate theories of psycho-geography, the concept of journey has been key in my work so far. I believe my interest in this stems from wanting to establish a connection with location, how humans build intimate relationships with their surroundings and the importance of term 'home'.

I tend to work through the medium of live performance, as the presence of the audience and the immediacy of first hand experience proves powerful. I often make my own props/ costumes but I am careful in doing this as even though theatricality is exciting, simplicity can be even more so. As much as being live and breathing in the same air as my audience can create a strong connection, I am interested in seeing how I can establish a physical and emotional exchange with them through a two dimensional source like film, photography, a piece of writing or a drawing. I have and will forever be passionate about drawing, it is how I research, how I visualise, how I perform.

 

 

Claire Prosser (Door Mat Piece)
Photograph taken May 2011during which I performed the one hour task on twenty three consecutive days. 

A daily activity. I declare to wipe my right leg only, on the same mat, wearing the same boots, for one hour every day, for as long as the materials will allow me to do so.


CHRIS WITHERALL
www.soundcloud.com/chriswitherall

Chris Witherall is a composer and musician living and working in Sussex. His recent work includes a folk concept work and a set of pieces for brass, strings, choir and electronics. 

Mind the Gap is an electro-acoustic composition which seeks to explore the way in which technological advancements have affected relationships. The London underground packs people into tight, closed spaces. However the travellers are often closed to each other and frustrated by their inability to escape. 
Mind the Gap is composed of altered sound files recorded from the tube system. Musical motifs (based on communication technology adverts and mobile ringtones) are recorded using a mobile phone. This causes a loss of tonal qualities and gives a scratchy, incomplete sound. Witherall has created a technique he calls Midi Lettering: Synthesizer motifs appear throughout the recording which sound messy and randomised. However the notes have been created by spelling words into the midi matrix in a sequencer. This means each synth line is a translation of a word which cannot be understood.
The work poses the question: By gaining the ability to communicate at will, have we lost something of the intimacy in relationships along the way?

 

 

More artist info coming soon...