Bath's Annual Fringe Visual Arts Festival
FAB is Bath's only visual arts festival, we actively promote and celebrate contemporary art in the Bath area and beyond, showcasing early career artists and curators, and those who find it difficult to break into (or prefer to operate outside of) the gallery based art scene.
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The Man Who Bought Stonehenge
and other stories…

Curated by Danielle Arundel, Katie Constantine and Sal Smart.
Free submission, email stonehenge@fringeartsbath.co.uk, deadline 30/04/16.

Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it” L.M Montgomery

Storytelling is one of the oldest forms of communication and still continues to play an integral part in society and the exchange of information, helping us to understand the world around us. If there was a chance that lesser known stories could disappear unnoticed, what tale would you be determined to tell?

Saturday
Apr162016

Everyone has a story to tell...

Need some inspiration. Check out StoryCorps - an organisation in the United States helping to archive the wisdom of generations.

Since 2003 they have recorded more than 35,000 meaningful conversations between two people who know each other (normally couples, relatives or close friends) across the country. The conversations are stored at the Library of Congress. They have an intense focus on collecting, sharing and preserving people's stories.

© StoryCorps


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You can search and listen to the latest stories.
- Or you can browse the stories using their app and record your own! Record and share the stories that are all around you.


BBC Radio 4 was inspired by StoryCorps and created The Listening Project - which focuses on capturing the nation in conversation. Some of the stories are broadcast on BBC Radio 4 and added to an audio archive, helping to preserve the stories for future generations.


I think Radio 4 controller, Gwyneth Williams sums the idea up really well - hinting at those utterly memorable stories which we are keen to hear about "I'd like to invite listeners to help us catch, broadcast and archive for the nation those rare exchanges that really matter; those conversations that can change the course of a life; that are utterly memorable; that we have all had and never forget.”


If you have any questions about submitting your ideas to The Man who bought Stonehenge and other stories do email us at the address above. (Submission deadline - 30 April).

Sal

Wednesday
Mar302016

One month left to submit your ideas for the exhibition

One month left to submit your ideas to The Man who bought Stonehenge and other stories... This call is open to everyone: artists, writers, photographers, musicians - all individuals!

Everyone has stumbled upon a story, in one form or another, that has compelled them to stop and linger in thought, even just for a short while (often with slight amazement) about what they have just encountered. It could of been a tale, a news article, a speech, an interview, a video or song - more than likely it made you bookmark it for later, scribble it down in a notebook, or even re-tell it to the person sat next to you. The Man Who Bought Stonehenge was one of those stories for me. 

So check those bookmarks, notebooks, phone notes, pin-boards and desktops because you just might have a great story to tell...

...and send us your ideas of how you could bring that story to life in the exhibition.

Sal 

Tuesday
Mar082016

The Man Who Bought Stonehenge

and other stories…

Nothing is ever really lost to us as long as we remember it” L.M Montgomery

Image credit: Cecil and Mary Chubb (Library of Congress)
Storytelling is one of the oldest forms of communication. It continues to play an integral part in society and the exchange of information, helping us to understand the world around us. Our knowledge of history is dependent on what has been recounted and remembered.

Today we share phenomenal amounts of information with a digital effortlessness, relying on technology to store and recall history. With an amassment of knowledge, ideas and beliefs and a dependence on technology to remember, is there a risk that lesser known stories could become overlooked, lost or forgotten, especially if they are not actively being shared?

With this in mind, we are calling on artists in all mediums to act as storytellers and awaken hidden histories that deserve greater attention. We encourage stories that are thought provoking, profound, insightful and humorous - stories that are rewarding and reveal the unknown, that can unmask a detail or uncover a universal truth. It is stories such as these that can capture the imagination and compel an audience to become the storyteller.

Guidelines: Do you have an artwork/series that has a story to tell? Open to proposals from artists in all mediums. (A written text may appear next to artworks outlining the story which is the source to the piece - text will be limited to 500 words). Submit your ideas before 30 April.

Curated by Danielle Arundel, Katie Constantine and Sal Smart.